An Ode to Sorrel

Now that sorrel is in my life…I will never be the same.
Spring will forever hold new meaning for me.

Sour Sorrel

Sour Sorrel

Best flavor comparison: baby kiwifruit
When I saw sorrel’s small, arrow-shaped leaves, I expected something akin to radish greens – spicy, earthy. When you bite into the leaves, however, the initial clean, watery taste is followed by a burst of citrus. Eric’s initial reaction, “What the…? Did it *!@#* a lemon?” If you don’t know what’s coming, sorrel will knock you off your feet.

We have been so enamored with sorrel’s fresh flavor, we haven’t dared saute it or puree it (two common ways it is prepared). Here I am, the salad hater, jumping at the chance to mix some fresh sorrel in with the salad mix and radish greens. On the first night, we threw together some greens, added boiled potatoes and topped it off with a blended balsamic/Dijon dressing and leftover chives. Fantastic. The sorrel plays so well with the vinaigrette, adding new dimensions to a simple salad.

Mixed Greens (with sorrel) and Potatoes with Sides of Asparagus and Morel Mushrooms

Mixed Greens (with sorrel) and Potatoes with Sides of Asparagus and Morel Mushrooms



Tell Me More…
Also known as Rumex acetosa, sorrel, according to Botanical.com is indigenous to England. Apparently sorrel is a slight diuretic, which after a long winter of heavy meats, potatoes and cheeses can have a nice cleansing effect. According to J. Benn Hurley,

Early Egyptians and Romans nibbled on fresh sorrel leaves after overeating, both for their soothing effect on the digestive system and for their diuretic properties. In North America, 200 years ago, sorrel was eaten as “lemonade in a leaf.” It’s a good source of vitamin C, and used to be taken to prevent scurvy.

Today sorrel is most commonly used in soups and sauces.
Sorrel Sauce
Sorrel Soup and Sorrel Pesto
Green Borscht

If these ideas don’t suit you fancy, take a look at these mouthwatering recipes:
Butter-Braised Radishes with Sorrel
Courgette (Zucchini) and Sorrel Fritters
Mariquita Farm also has several ideas (Sorrel and Goat Cheese Quiche)

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